Monday, December 23, 2002

Freedom of Media and Having and Alternate Voice.

Today's media has considated to the point where virtually everything you read is indirectly controlled by 8 white guys. True or False?

True, depending on how you look at it.

Take Clear Channel and NPR. One represents mostly music, the other, mostly news and 'views'. Wouldn't it be a wonderful thing if media had a local voice? Something that really reflected what was happening in your local community? You don't have it today. NPR plays the role with several hundred local non profit stations; but those stations are increasingly consolidated and focused on 'general' information that is specific to the overall state. Here in Colorado our NPR entity has done away with local reporters and local issues and now focuses primarily on the state-wide issues and well filtered news from their parent in Washington D.C. And that entity in D.C. is a billion dollar corporation, not unlike the other large media conglomerates that today have knuckled under to the 'neo conservative' agenda of the Bush administration and it's supporters. Clear Channel is another story altogether. If you were to run your radio as much like a McDonalds (or any fast food chain) restaurant, you'd have the Clear Channel model for radio pretty well in hand. They control most of the top stations in most of the urban markets in America and, as a result, they determine what you listen to during the 5 hours a day that average American spents listening to the radio. One thing you won't hear is local music, or even music that's all that interesting. What you will hear is the same formula, over and over, and an ever increasing amount of commercial messages with commentary by centralized banks of DJ's coistered a few states recording generic messages that can be played in Iowa, Nevada or Colorado.

This site will explore these companies and others and expand on how they control your worldview in ways that will not only suprise and disturb you, but shock you.

Stay tuned.

Monk

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